Profession: The long and winding road – a benefit for all concerned

10. May 2017

The need for a career path in Lighting Design.

Text: Alison Ritter


How would anyone of school leaving age hit upon the idea of becoming a lighting designer? Who is able to explain what a lighting designer is, and what s/he does for whom and why? The know-how and experience gathered by practicing lighting designers from around the world over the years, and the creative skills that have developed with each commissioned job, need pooling into a clearly defined structure: a career path in Lighting Design. A tough task – a long and winding the road – but a benefit for all concerned.

Many schools provide a career advice service to support school leavers deciding on a university or a specific study programme, or to open young people’s minds as to what kind of career they would like to pursue. At the age of 18 or 19, not many school leavers are clear of where they envisage themselves to be five years down the road. Some have known they wanted to be a doctor, nurse, judge, journalist, teacher or pilot since their early secondary school days. Why? Because such professions are known to them: they can imagine what it would be like to get up every morning and don a white coat, a smart uniform, judicial robes, or grab a bag full of marked exercise books or the necessary photographic/recording equipment to carry out an interview with a politician, a film star or a football player … All imaginable. All possible. How would anyone of school leaving age hit upon the idea of becoming a lighting designer? Good question. Who is able to explain what a lighting designer is, and what s/he does for whom and why? Ask any practising lighting designer from anywhere in the world and you will get a clear overview of the scope of work performed, the size of the design team and possibly names of award-winning projects. However acknowledged or even renowned the lighting designer providing the facts and figures may be, the information will vary considerably. The know-how and experience gathered over the years, and the creative skills that have developed with each commissioned job, need pooling into a clearly defined structure that anyone can follow – however long and winding the road may be, it needs to makes sense.


The full version of the article can be found in PLD No. 104 as well as in our PLD magazine app (iPad App Store).


 

My opinion:

Leave a comment / Kommentieren

Leave the first comment / Erster Kommentar

avatar

©2018 published by VIA-Verlag | Marienfelder Strasse 18 | 33330 Guetersloh | Germany

Page generated in 0.135 seconds. Stats plugin by www.blog.ca