04. Jan 2016

When food becomes a religion

Photos: PSLab

“The Jane” is a restaurant in a redbrick structure that used to be a chapel for a military hospital in Antwerp/B. The team from the Dutch architects’ firm Piet Boon Studio were commissioned to renovate the chapel building and create a modern restaurant with a highly original atmosphere, by merging old and new.

For the interior, the designers opted for a rich selection of high-quality materials such as natural stone, leather and oak. The unique quality of the redesigned space is underscored by the lighting details, complementing the exclusive Michelin Star cuisine.

IN_The Jane_CP _quer2jpg

During the daytime, daylight pours through the custom designed stained glass windows, which were inspired by the building’s original function. The images tell of good and evil, but also depict food and religious cues. In the evening the space is softly illuminated by a huge custom designed chandelier, which was inspired by the lionfish. The chandelier weighs 800 kilos, each of the 150 metal “tentacles” ending in a glass sphere containing an LED source. In spite of its weight the chandelier appears to be floating in space.

A one-metre wide glowing neon skull designed by artist Kendell Geers and suspended above the glazed kitchen space where the altar originally was, provides a further highlight. The bar and tables in the restaurant are lit by directional spotlights mounted on steel beams. In the evening the light is dimmed to create an unusual atmosphere for an exclusive dining experience. When food becomes a religion, you might say!

Project team:

Client: Sergio Herman  and Nick Bril
Architects: Piet Boon Studio
Lighting concept: PSLab
Neon skull art piece: Kendell Geers
Stained glass window: Studio Job – Job Smeets and Nynke Tynagel

www.pslab.net
www.pietboon.com

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